Healthcare Professionals

More than 70 years ago in Sweden, engineer Einar Egnell made it his life’s work to help breastfeeding mothers. After years of research, Egnell created the first comfortable and effective breast pump. In the process, Egnell also created the vacuum and cycling standards that today’s lactation professionals use to judge breast pump quality.

Today’s Ameda breast pumps combine Egnell’s innovative technology with the features a 21st century mother expects. Everything Ameda offers –Ameda breast pumps and products, Ameda breastfeeding education, Ameda’s support of lactation professionals – reflects our passion for breastfeeding. We know how much breastfeeding matters to mothers and babies.

We also believe in the advancement of evidence-based medicine. Read on to learn more about research our products have been a part of in the effort to advance lactation science.

AMEDA BREAST PUMPS

Multi-User, Hospital-Grade Pumps

Ameda Platinum® Breast Pump

Examining the use and outcomes of a new hospital-grade breast pump in exclusively pumping NICU mothers
Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah

This study evaluated whether full milk production, defined as 700 mL/d, could be achieved by Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) mothers who delivered infants between 26-32 weeks gestational age, exclusively using the Ameda Platinum breast pump in the first 14 days postpartum. The study found that the average maximum daily milk volume expressed for all mothers in the study was 817mL/d. Mothers reported liking the ability to control pump suction and speed separately and considered this an important component of achieving comfortable and efficient pumping. In conclusion, the Ameda Platinum breast pump is an effective, multi-user, hospital-grade pump for exclusively pumping mothers to establish a full milk production. 

Reference: Larkin T, Kiehn T, Murphy P, Uhryniak J. Examining the use and outcomes of a new hospital-grade breast pump in exclusively pumping NICU mothers. Adv Neo Care. 2013;13(1):75–82.

Ameda EliteTM Breast Pump

A randomized controlled trial to compare methods of milk expression after preterm delivery

North Staffordshire Maternity Hospital, United Kingdom

The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in milk volume expressed between simultaneous (pumping both breasts at the same time) and sequential (pumping one breast after the other) breast pumping by 36 NICU mothers using the Ameda Elite Pump. A secondary measure was to determine the effect of breast massage on milk volume and fat content. The study showed that simultaneous pumping using the Ameda Elite Pump was more effective than sequential pumping (88mL vs. 51mL/session), and that breast massage has an additive effect (while simultaneous or sequential pumping) in improving milk production (125mL vs. 79mL/session). Fat content was not altered by any of the techniques implemented.

PMID: 11517200 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reference: Jones E, Dimmock PW, Spencer SA. A randomised controlled trial to compare methods of milk expression after preterm delivery. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2001;85(2):F91-95.

The association between an electric pump loan program and the timing of requests for formula by working mothers in WIC
The Public Health Foundations Enterprises WIC Program, greater Los Angeles area, CA

The purpose of this study was to determine whether providing an Ameda Elite double electric breast pump to low-income, full-time working women would facilitate their ability to continue breastfeeding and impact their decision on whether and when they requested infant formula. Mothers who received this pump as soon as requested did not request formula until an average of 8.8 months opposed to an average of 4.8 months for those mothers who did not receive this pump when requested. Mothers who received this pump when requested were 5.5 times as likely as mothers who did not receive this pump to not request formula at 6 months.

PMID 18436966 PUB MED

Reference: Meehan K, Harrison GG, Afifi AA, Nickel N, Jenks E, Ramirez A. The association between an electric pump loan program and the timing of requests for formula by working mothers in WIC. J Hum Lact. 2008;24(2):150-8.

Does the Ameda Elite breast pump have the ability to bring in and maintain the milk supply of mothers whose babies are in the Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU)?
Stormont-Vail Regional Health Center, Topeka, Kansas, USA

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Ameda Elite breast pump to establish and maintain milk supply in 28 mothers of NICU babies, born at 25-36 weeks gestational age, during the first 14 days postpartum. Over the 14 day study period, these mothers were able to achieve an average daily milk supply of 711mL (23.7oz) by day 14, a full milk supply.

Download Elite Rosen Study (below) to read more.

Reference: Rosen L, Shuster K, Cornsweet Barber C. Does the Ameda Elite breast pump have the ability to bring in and maintain the milk supply of mothers whose babies are in the Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU)? Poster Presentation. International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA) conference in Acapulco, Mexico. 2001.

Ameda SMB™ Breast Pump

Comparison of hand- and electric-operated breast pumps
Baylor College of Medicine & Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

The purpose of this study was to compare volume, fat and energy content in human milk samples collected with either an Ameda SMB electric breast pump or a Medela hand pump. The energy content was significantly higher in samples obtained using the Ameda SMB electric pump.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reference: Boutte CA, Garza C, Fraley JK, Stuff JE, Smith EO. Comparison of hand- and electric-operated breast pumps. Hum Nutr Appl Nutr. 1985;39(6):426-30.



An evaluation of breast pumps currently available on the American market
Eight breast pumps commonly seen in clinical practice were measured and ranked for desirability in pressure range and control, size and shape of nipple cup, volume accommodation, visual feedback, ease of cleaning and handling, and cost. The Ameda SMB Pump was one of three breast pumps to receive a relatively high score, while an additional three breast pumps received low scores and the remaining two breast pumps evaluated appeared to be ineffective.

PMID: 6848288 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reference: Johnson CA. An evaluation of breast pumps currently available on the American market Clin Pediatr. 1983;22(1):40-5.



The relative efficacy of four methods of human milk expression.
The study was designed to evaluate four methods of milk expression for mothers of both full term healthy infants as well as sick or premature infants, measuring the amount of milk and fat content expressed by each method during a 10-min period. The four methods included the Ameda SMB electric pump, two manual pumps of other brands, and manual expression. The Ameda SMB double electric pump enabled mothers to express significantly more milk with adequate fat content during the expression period than any of the other methods tested.

Reference: Green D, Moye L, Schreiner RL, Lemons JA. The relative efficacy of four methods of human milk expression. Early Hum Dev. 1982;6(2):153-9.

Single User, Personal Breast Pumps

Ameda Purely Yours® Breast Pump

Growth and nutrient intakes of human milk-fed preterm infants provided with extra energy and nutrients after hospital discharge.*
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

The purpose of this study was to determine whether mixing a multinutrient fortifier to approximately one half of the human milk fed each day for a finite period after discharge improves the nutrient intake and growth of predominantly human milk-fed (>80% feedings daily) low birth weight infants (750-1800g). The impact of this intervention on the exclusivity of human milk feeding was also evaluated. Infants in the intervention group grew longer during the study period, and those born < or = 1250 g had larger head circumferences than infants in the control group. Infants who received the multinutrient fortifier also trended to weigh more at the end of the study period than infants in the control group.. Average protein, zinc, calcium, phosphorus, and vitamins A and D intakes were higher in the intervention group as well. More infants in the intervention group continued to receive mother’s milk 12 weeks post-discharge (88 vs 71%). In conclusion, results from this study suggest that adding a multinutrient fortifier to approximately one half of the milk provided to predominantly human milk-fed infants for 12 weeks after hospital discharge may be an effective strategy in addressing early discharge nutrient deficits and poor growth without unduly influencing human milk feeding when intensive lactation support is provided.

*The Ameda Purely Yours breast pump was used in this study to help mothers maintain their milk supply.

PMID: 18381542

Reference: O'Connor DL, Khan S, Weishuhn K, Vaughan J, Jefferies A, Campbell DM, Asztalos E, Feldman M, Rovet J, Westall C, Whyte H. Growth and nutrient intakes of human milk-fed preterm infants provided with extra energy and nutrients after hospital discharge. Pediatrics. 2008;121(4):766-76.

Accessories

Ameda ComfortGel™ Hydrogel Pads

Comparing the use of hydrogel dressings to lanolin ointment with lactating mothers.
University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of Ameda ComfortGel hydrogel pads for the prevention and treatment of nipple soreness in lactating women compared to the common intervention of lanolin ointment. The group using Ameda ComfortGel hydrogel pads had significantly greater reduction in pain score mean values in comparison to the group using lanolin ointment. Mothers using the hydrogel pads discontinued treatment sooner than mothers using lanolin ointment. In addition, the lanolin ointment group had eight breast infections, whereas the Ameda ComfortGel hydrogel pad group had none.

PMID: 12903698 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Reference: Dodd V, Chalmers C. Comparing the use of hydrogel dressings to lanolin ointment with lactating mothers. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2003;32(4):486-94.

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